APPROACHES TO THE COMMON CORE: Trajectory Analysis*

The Literacy Cookbook COVERNo matter what grade or subject you teach, you need to know not only about the standards for the grade(s) you teach, but also for the grades before and after.  Why?  Because you need to know how prepared your students are supposed to be when you meet them, and you need to know what your responsibilities are.  Moreover, by closely examining a standard’s entire trajectory, you can determine where your students actually are in terms of their development.  As one teacher remarked as we looked at the grade-by-grade path of Reading for Informational Text (RIT) Standard #1 (see below), “I can tell you where each of my students are on this chart.  They’re all in seventh grade, but looking at the descriptions, I can see that three of my students are on the fifth-grade level, about five are on the sixth-grade level, and the rest are where they should be.  And now I need to think about how I’m going to get them all up to speed, not just on the seventh-grade level but ready for eighth grade.”

Let’s consider the trajectory of RIT Standard #1.  I have modeled how to analyze these standards with the first few grades (underlining key word differences and jotting notes in the right-hand column) and left the rest blank for you to use as a PD exercise.  You can find a FREE electronic version of this chart, called “RIT Standard 1 Trajectory Analysis Chart” on the TLC “Standards” page.[1]  PS—This analysis process works best if participants pair up to discuss their interpretations, then share out with the whole group.  Partnering generates more ideas (and useful questions) than solo independent work.

  STANDARD DIFFERENCE FROM PREVIOUS GRADE?
RIT K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. N/A
RIT 1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. Ask questions without prompting.
RIT 2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. Use 5W’s and H questions, not just any old questions.
RIT 3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. Refer to the text when answering questions.
RIT 4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  
RIT 5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  
RIT 6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.  
RIT 7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.  
RIT 8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.  
RIT 9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.  
RIT 11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

*This post, which previously appeared in slightly different form as a MiddleWeb Guest Article called “Common Core Trajectory Analysis,” is an excerpt from my next book, a work-in-progress.  Stay tuned for details!

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About theliteracycookbook

In addition to this blog, I am the creator of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK Website (www.literacycookbook.com) and ONLY GOOD BOOKS Blog (http://onlygoodbooks.wordpress.com/), and the author of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK: A Practical Guide to Effective Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Instruction (Jossey-Bass, 2012) and LITERACY AND THE COMMON CORE: Recipes for Action (Jossey-Bass, 2014). Check out my Website for more information about my consulting work.
This entry was posted in Analyzing the Common Core Standards, ELA Common Core Standards, Reading Informational Text, TLC Website Resources, Trajectory Analysis and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to APPROACHES TO THE COMMON CORE: Trajectory Analysis*

  1. Pingback: TRAJECTORY ANALYSIS CHARTS: Reading Informational Texts (RIT) | The Literacy Cookbook blog

  2. Pingback: MORE TRAJECTORY ANALYSIS CHARTS: Reading Literature (RL) | The Literacy Cookbook blog

  3. Pingback: Common Core Resources on the TLC Website: ALL ELA Trajectory Analysis Charts Are Now Available!!! | The Literacy Cookbook blog

  4. Pingback: Rebooted TLC “Standards” Page! | The Literacy Cookbook blog

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