MORE TRAJECTORY ANALYSIS CHARTS: Comparing RIT vs. RL Standards

The Literacy Cookbook COVERIf you haven’t spent much time studying the ELA Common Core Standards, you might consider them daunting (“There are so many!” I’ve heard people say).  But in fact there aren’t that many, and they are logically—even elegantly—organized.  For instance, if you put the Reading Informational Text Standards next to the Reading Literature Standards, you will see that they are actually quite similar except that they deal with different genres.

To save you some time, I have created “Trajectory Analysis Charts Comparing RIT vs. RL” and added this document to the TLC “Standards” page***.  Here is an excerpt featuring Standard #3 to give you a taste:

ST. #3 Reading INFORMATIONAL TEXT Reading LITERATURE
K With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
1 Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
2 Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
3 Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
4 Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
5 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
6 Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes). Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
7 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events). Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
8 Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
9-10 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters,

and advance the plot or develop the theme.

11-12 Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

***PS, if you would like to be a subscriber to the TLC Website and are not currently registered, click HERE for a 50%-off discount code!

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About theliteracycookbook

In addition to this blog, I am the creator of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK Website (www.literacycookbook.com) and ONLY GOOD BOOKS Blog (http://onlygoodbooks.wordpress.com/), and the author of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK: A Practical Guide to Effective Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Instruction (Jossey-Bass, 2012) and LITERACY AND THE COMMON CORE: Recipes for Action (Jossey-Bass, 2014). Check out my Website for more information about my consulting work.
This entry was posted in Analyzing the Common Core Standards, Curriculum, ELA Common Core Standards, Reading Informational Text, Reading Literature, Resources, TLC Website Resources, Trajectory Analysis and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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