MORE TRAJECTORY ANALYSIS CHARTS: Reading Literature (RL)

The Literacy Cookbook COVERAvid readers of this blog are aware that I have been feverishly creating Trajectory Analysis Charts on the ELA Common Core Standards so that teachers and school leaders can see the progression of standards from grade to grade and use these tools not only to design curriculum but also to determine where their students are when it comes to any given standard.

In my first post on this subject, I showed the trajectory of RIT (Reading Informational Text) Standard #1 from K-12.  You could look at that chart and say, “Hey, my fourth-graders are all on grade level with this standard” or “Well, some are, and some aren’t.”  If you said the latter, you’d have to figure out who exactly was not on grade level and what to do about it.  Some might be on the first-grade level; some might be on the third.  They would need different interventions.

Here is an excerpt (Standard #2) from the “Trajectory Analysis Charts-Reading Literature,” which I’ve added to the TLC “Standards” page***:

  STANDARD DIFFERENCE FROM PREVIOUS GRADE?
RL K.2 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. N/A
RL 1.2 Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.  
RL 2.2 Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.  
RL 3.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.  
RL 4.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.  
RL 5.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.  
RL 6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.  
RL 7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.  
RL 8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.  
RL 9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.  
RL 11-12.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.  

In my next post, I’ll show you how the RIT (Reading Informational Text) Standards compare to the RL (Reading Literature) Standards….

***PS, if you would like to be a subscriber to the TLC Website and are not currently registered, click HERE for a 50%-off discount code!

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About theliteracycookbook

In addition to this blog, I am the creator of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK Website (www.literacycookbook.com) and ONLY GOOD BOOKS Blog (http://onlygoodbooks.wordpress.com/), and the author of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK: A Practical Guide to Effective Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Instruction (Jossey-Bass, 2012) and LITERACY AND THE COMMON CORE: Recipes for Action (Jossey-Bass, 2014). Check out my Website for more information about my consulting work.
This entry was posted in Analyzing the Common Core Standards, Curriculum, ELA Common Core Standards, Reading Literature, Resources, TLC Website Resources, Trajectory Analysis and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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