APPROACHES TO THE COMMON CORE: How to Teach RIT Standard #1 in Elementary School

The Literacy Cookbook COVERRecently I met with some elementary teachers—in this case, 3rd-grade teachers—who discovered that their students could not meet Reading Information Text (RIT) Standard #1: “Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.”

When we looked at the RIT Trajectory Analysis Chart for that standard (see below), the teachers realized that in fact, their students could not meet the 3rd-grade standard because they hadn’t yet mastered the 2nd-grade standard, which is: “Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.”  So we decided to target the 2nd-grade standard first, and we worked together to create a “5W’s and H” graphic organizer.  For a model based on the Grinch, see the 5W’s and H organizer MODEL.  For a blank version, see the 5W’s and H organizer BLANK.

You will notice that in the model, we included examples of each type of question and answer, along with hints to support students as they respond.  While “Who” and “When” questions are fairly easy to answer, students often conflate “How” and “Why” questions: they tend to answer both questions with “because,” which is incorrect.  For more information on the “How vs. Why” problem, click HERE.

  RIT Trajectory Analysis Chart: STANDARD #1
RIT K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
RIT 1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
RIT 2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
RIT 3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
RIT 4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RIT 5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RIT 6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RIT 7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RIT 8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RIT 9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RIT 11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Note: The “5 W’s and H organizer-BLANK” and “MODEL” can be found in several places on The Literacy Cookbook Website: on the Analyzing Literature page, the Nonfiction Reading Strategies page, and the Questioning page.  Additional Common Core Trajectory Analysis Charts can be found on the TLC Standards page.

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About theliteracycookbook

In addition to this blog, I am the creator of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK Website (www.literacycookbook.com) and ONLY GOOD BOOKS Blog (http://onlygoodbooks.wordpress.com/), and the author of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK: A Practical Guide to Effective Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Instruction (Jossey-Bass, 2012) and LITERACY AND THE COMMON CORE: Recipes for Action (Jossey-Bass, 2014). Check out my Website for more information about my consulting work.
This entry was posted in Analyzing the Common Core Standards, Comprehension, ELA Common Core Standards, How vs. Why, Questioning, Reading Informational Text, Resources, TLC Website Resources, Trajectory Analysis and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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