APPROACHES TO THE COMMON CORE: How to Teach Reading Literature Standard #3

The Literacy Cookbook COVERHere’s CCSS Reading Anchor Standard #3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

The Trajectory Analysis Chart for this standard when Reading Literature looks like this:

  STANDARD
RL K.3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
RL 1.3 Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
RL 2.3 Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
RL 3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
RL 4.3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
RL 5.3 Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
RL 6.3 Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
RL 7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL 8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
RL 9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
RL 11-12.3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

Recently, my friend Allison Miller (teaching 8th-grade English) invented a user-friendly way to teach this standard.  Check out the “Using Plot Points to Analyze Characters” organizer below (Note: The file is available here: Using Plot Points to Analyze Characters ORGANIZER).

TITLE:____________________________________________________  AUTHOR:____________________________________

Plot Point (What’s happening?)

What is REVEALED about the character(s)?

HOW do you know?  (Use evidence from the text.)

Introduction:

 

 

 

   
Rising Action:

 

 

   
Climax/ Turning Point:

 

 

 

   
Falling Action:

 

 

   
Resolution:

 

 

 

   

I created a model using How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr. Seuss, available here: Using Plot Points to Analyze Characters MODEL

Allison’s 8th-grade student Ateera Blackwood also contributed her own example based on the story “Abuela Invents the Zero” from An Island Like You by Judith Ortiz Cofer, available here: Using Plot Points to Analyze Characters STUDENT EXAMPLE

*Note: The organizer and models (along with other character analysis tools!) can also be found on the TLC “Analyzing Literature” page.

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About theliteracycookbook

In addition to this blog, I am the creator of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK Website (www.literacycookbook.com) and ONLY GOOD BOOKS Blog (http://onlygoodbooks.wordpress.com/), and the author of THE LITERACY COOKBOOK: A Practical Guide to Effective Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Instruction (Jossey-Bass, 2012) and LITERACY AND THE COMMON CORE: Recipes for Action (Jossey-Bass, 2014). Check out my Website for more information about my consulting work.
This entry was posted in Character Analysis, ELA Common Core Standards, Evidence, Explanation, Inference, Reading Literature, Resources, TLC Website Resources, Trajectory Analysis and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to APPROACHES TO THE COMMON CORE: How to Teach Reading Literature Standard #3

  1. Anne K. says:

    Reading should be encouraged to learn data, enjoy a good laugh, learn american history, have a restful moment, encourage others to read. and research data for truthfulness. Enjoy reading

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